UBS adviser doesn’t think he’ll get a fair manslaughter trial in Anguilla

SIMPSON BAY, St. Martin — The Connecticut banker charged with killing a hotel worker in Anguilla told The Post on Wednesday he “absolutely” doesn’t think he’ll get a fair trial on the island.

Still, Gavin Scott Hapgood, 44, said he “doesn’t have a choice” but to put his faith in the justice system — as he awaited a connecting flight to the British Overseas Territory for a mandated check-in with authorities.

“I’m surprised by the arrest … ,” he said. “I was innocent from day one.”

The UBS UBS, +0.58% financial adviser — set to stand trial for manslaughter on the tiny Caribbean island — has claimed that resort hand Kenny Mitchel, 27, showed up at his family’s room at the five-star Malliouhana hotel on April 13, wielding a knife and demanding money.

angA violent struggle ensued — resulting in the maintenance worker’s death and the Darien banker under arrest.

The Dartmouth graduate has maintained his innocence — saying he was simply protecting his daughters, then 11 and 13.

“It [the fight] makes sense to me,” he said Tuesday. “I know what happened.”

Since the incident, Hapgood said he and his family have received threats of violence.

At the airport, Hapgood was accompanied by a bodyguard, and said the Royal Anguilla Police Force would also be providing him with a security detail.

Some residents on the island have expressed outrage that Hapgood was released on $74,000 bail and allowed to go home, arguing that he received special treatment as a wealthy tourist.

At a Manhattan press conference Tuesday, Hapgood and his attorney, Juliya Arbisman, stressed that the banker was planning on attending all mandated hearings as promised — including one this Thursday, where the case is expected to be adjourned.

The financial strain stemming from the multiple plane trips and the case has been overwhelming, Hapgood said. He’s on leave from UBS, but said the Swiss investment-banking operation has been supportive.

The married dad of three said he wishes he could speed up the judicial process.

“I wish the trial was today,” he told The Post. “I wish the facts were coming out today so I could move on with my life.”

This story originally appeared at NYPost.com

Source: Read Full Article