The new Grand Reserve card offers bonus points on wine purchases that you can use for tastings, decanters, and more

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  • The Grand Reserve World Mastercard is a new credit card that earns bonus rewards on wine purchases.
  • You can use your points for wine accessories, tastings, and more — the company is working to add redemptions for actual wine through various wineries in the future.
  • The Grand Reserve card has a $149 annual fee and includes a complimentary wine magazine membership, discounted tastings, and access to exclusive cardmember events.
  • Other credit card companies have incorporated wine and dining benefits into their rewards programs, such as discounts on wine purchases through Amex Offers.
  • See Business Insider's list of the best rewards credit cards »

Many top rewards credit cards offer fine-dining benefits like statement credits for eating out and help scoring reservations at buzzy restaurants, but the Grand Reserve World Mastercard takes things a step further with a rewards program that's literally all about wine.

You'll earn the most points when you use the card to shop at wineries, and you can use your rewards for wine accessories, classes, and other experiences. The Grand Reserve is not the only card that lets you redeem rewards for wine-related purchases — since most credit card points can be used for merchandise and gift cards — but it does offer the most comprehensive lineup of wine-related benefits I've seen on a credit card.

We're focused here on the rewards and perks that come with each card. These cards won't be worth it if you're paying interest or late fees. When using a credit card, it's important to pay your balance in full each month, make payments on time, and only spend what you can afford to pay.

The new Grand Reserve credit card

The Grand Reserve World Mastercard has a $149 annual fee with no foreign transaction fees. It's issued by Celtic Bank & Trust and uses the Deserve, Inc. platform that's become popular over the last few years — it lets brands develop customized rewards programs like the wine-focused one offered on this card.

The Grand Reserve card earns points based on the following structure, which naturally favors wine purchases:

  • 5 points per dollar at more than 350 Grand Reserve partners, including boutique wineries across the country and wine clubs
  • 3 points per dollar at more than 17,000 wineries, wine clubs, and wine shops
  • 2 points per dollar at all other merchants

The card is offering a new-cardholder bonus of 50,000 points after you spend $3,000 in the first 90 days from account opening.

You can use points for various wine-related items, including wine keys, decanters, and books, as well as experiences like classes and tastings. If you head to the Grand Reserve Rewards catalog, you'll see some sample redemptions, including:

  • 750 points for a Grand Reserve corkscrew
  • 2,400 points for a Vacu Vin Wine Saver
  • 150,800 points for an Avanti 50-Bottle Stainless Steel Wine Cooler

According to NerdWallet, Grand Reserve points are worth 0.5 cents to 0.9 cents apiece depending on how you use them. Credit card points can be worth as much as 2 cents (or even 5 to 10 cents, for certain awards like first-class flights) each, so this isn't necessarily the best return on spending. But if you spend a lot on wine each month, using the Grand Reserve card could help you rack up rewards quick;y.

For legal reasons, the rewards currently don't include actual wine, but a spokesperson said that the company is working with partners to enable consumers to use their points directly at wineries in the future. That's when my inner oenophile will really get excited. 

Other benefits and details

In addition to earning rewards that you can redeem for wine accessories and experiences, the Grand Reserve card comes with the following wine-centric perks:

  • Complimentary Priority Wine Pass membership, which gets you discounted tastings at hundreds of West Coast wineries (virtual tastings will be available as well)
  • Complimentary subscription to a wine magazine of your choice, from a selection offered through your online card account
  • Access to exclusive Grand Reserve cardmember events (no details on these events have been shared yet)

The Grand Reserve card also includes the follow Mastercard perks:

  • $5 off every Postmates order of $25 or more
  • Free Shoprunner membership for free two-day shipping with more than 100 stores
  • 10% off onefinestay private home bookings

Making wine rewarding

The Grand Reserve may be the first card of its kind, but credit card companies have been incorporating wine and dining into their loyalty programs for some time. 

American Express runs a series of "By Invitation Only" events for cardmembers with the The Platinum Card® from American Express, The Business Platinum Card® from American Express, or Centurion card. These include private dinners with world-renowned chefs, and cost about $1,500 per person.

And on the more affordable level, Amex has been running several discounts for wine purchases through its Amex Offers program. I've recently taken advantage of several of these to save on wine orders from Winc, Wine Insiders, and more. 

If you love wine, the Grand Reserve card looks to be a fun way to get rewarded for stocking up on bottles. Most cards don't offer bonus points on wine purchases, after all.

The ability to redeem points for actual wine will be a great addition in the future — fancy wine coolers and decanters are nice, but I'd be seriously tempted by a card that lets me put my spending toward beverages for future Zoom happy hours.

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